Monthly Archives: June 2011

Discipleship in Christianity and Judaism, expanded edition

Yesterday I posted my initial thoughts on discipleship in Judaism and Christianity. This post addresses the same subject in more detail. The following was submitted to my university tonight. I thought the rest of the world might benefit from it … Continue reading

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Discipleship in Christianity and Judaism

These are my initial thoughts on the subject. For a more complete treatment, see the next post, Discipleship in Christianity and Judaism: Expanded Edition. Discipleship is a term common to Christianity and Judaism. This is not surprising, as Christianity inherited … Continue reading

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D. Thomas Lancaster – The Holy Epistle to the Galatians, full review

I recently finished D. Thomas Lancaster’s new book, The Holy Epistle to the Galatians. Reading the whole book basically confirmed the sentiments I had last week upon reading the first few chapters: The Holy Epistle to the Galatians is one … Continue reading

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The King and the High Priest

Once a year on Yom Kippur, the High Priest would enter the Holy of Holies to make atonement for the entire nation of Israel (Lev. 16). This statute was to be permanently observed by the children of Israel forever. Today, … Continue reading

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PMJ, Mark Kinzer and Michael Brown: A Study in Religion and Rhetoric

As I wrote when I began our discussion of Postmissionary Messianic Judaism, the second Google search result for the book’s title is Michael Brown’s response. The first is amazon.com. Because this is the first piece of information I encountered on … Continue reading

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Lancaster on Galatians: The Preservation of Jewish Identity

As I crack open D.T. Lancaster’s new commentary on Galatians, I am reminded of one of the “elephants in the room” he has taught me about – concepts that were so obvious to the apostolic writers that they didn’t bear explanation, … Continue reading

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PMJ: Historical Factors to Guide and Inform Exegesis

We return to our review of Mark Kinzer’s Postmissionary Messianic Judaism: Redefining Christian Engagement with the Jewish People. In our last segment, we talked about irreducible ambiguity – the idea that many words, phrases, and pericopes in the Bible (and … Continue reading

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Postmissionary Messianic Judaism and Irreducible Ambiguity

A while back, I was sitting by a campfire with my friend and spiritual mentor. We were talking about the state of the variegated “Hebrew Roots” movement, and whether it is a viable entity or whether its serious internal disputes … Continue reading

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Why have we made Christology our only Shibboleth?

The Shibboleth comes from a story in the book of Judges. The tribe of Ephraim was unable to pronounce the letter “shin”. So their adversaries, men of Gilead, would test anyone attempting to cross the border by asking them to … Continue reading

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The Didache and the Importance of Oral Tradition

As one of my recent commenters was quick to point out, the Apostolic Decree in Acts 15 lacks prohibitions on some of the major sins, such as murder and perjury. On the other hand, it contains no positive commandments – … Continue reading

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